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Communications Sciences and Disorders Labs

Our Labs

Early Childhood Communication Lab

Focused on research related to the development of communication and language in infants and toddlers.

English Learner Lab

Dedicated to increasing knowledge of school-age EL children's language development.

Child Language Lab

Directed at increasing our understanding of language development and developmental language disorders with particular emphasis on the difficulties experienced by children with specific language impairment (SLI).

Sean Redmond, PhD, CCC-SLP​​​​​​​

Child Speech Studies Lab (CSSL)

Dedicated to answering questions related to the impact of clefting on early speech/language development and how these early deficits impact later speech/language learning.

Kathy L. Chapman, Ph.D CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow​​​​​​​

Speech Fluency Lab

Equipped with a wide variety of instrumentation to study temporal, spectral, and behavioral aspects of speech production in fluent and stuttering speakers.

Michael Blomgren, PhD, CCC-SLP

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Speech Acoustics and Perception Lab

Investigates talker factors that affect speech understanding in listeners with hearing loss, especially older adults. Our chief interest is in clear speech, the speech that talkers produce when their communication partner is having trouble understanding them.

Sarah Hargus Ferguson, PhD, CCC-A​​​​​​​

Voice Lab

The Voice Lab in the Department of Communication Disorders is directed by Dr. Nelson Roy.

Nelson Roy, PhD, CCC-SLP

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Acquired Neurogenic Communication Disorders Lab

The overarching missing of our laboratory is to design and test clinically applicable treatments for persons with aphasia and/or acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) utilizing sound theoretical bases for treatment and rigorous experimental methods.

Julie Wambaugh, PhD

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Auditory Perception and Physiology Lab

Research in the Jennings Lab has a broad impact on an understanding how the auditory system adapts to noisy backgrounds and how this adaptation influences auditory perception in adults with normal and impaired hearing.

Skyler Jennings AuD. PhD, CCC-A

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