Skip to main content
Nutrition Minor

Program Core Courses

SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN NUTRITION & HEALTH

NUIP 1020

THREE (3) CREDIT - Applied Science (AS)

Fall Term | Spring Term | Summer Term

PREREQUISITES 

High school biology and chemistry

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will focus on the following areas: A) The role of carbohydrates, protein, lipids, water, vitamins and minerals in human nutrition. B) The relationship of nutrition to maintenance of health and prevention of disease. C) The role of nutrition in weight control, sports nutrition, eating disorders, pregnancy/lactation, and chronic disease. Students will also participate in laboratory applications for lipid profile and blood pressure assessment.

COURSE TOPICS
  1. Vitamins & Minerals: antioxidants
  2. Vitamins & Minerals: energy metabolism/blood
  3. Carbohydrates
  4. Chronic Diseases & Nutrition: Cardiovascular disease, cancer & Osteoporosis
  5. Energy balance
  6. Weight Control
  7. Nutrition in the Life Cycle
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Perform a diet and energy expenditure analysis utilizing computer software, analyze and interpret the results for dietary adequacy, health and risk for nutritionally-related chronic diseases, as well as make recommendations for improving nutritional health.
  • Integrate the scientific knowledge of nutrition, genetics, chemistry, metabolism, exercise and lifestyle while utilizing standards and guidelines to plan, evaluate, and manage diets to support life-long health.
  • Describe how the human body digests food, metabolizes and utilizes the nutrients and Calories/energy in health or disease; and identify risks factors for developing chronic disease including the interpretation of biochemical, clinical and anthropometrical laboratory measures.
  • Utilize basic nutritional scientific terminology; describe the essential nutrients and their role in normal metabolism; and identify good dietary sources of nutrients.
  • Evaluate food package label information - analytically and critically knowing the basis of the specific standards used for providing nutrition information; and understand the responsibility of the FDA to insure the safety of processed foods in order to make healthy food choices.
  • Identify scientific methods used; discern the reliability of nutrition information based on scientific evidence, source and professional credentials; in addition to describing the federal agencies and their responsibilities to insure public food safety, sustainable food production; and personal food handling skills to avoid food borne illness from a variety of microorganisms.
NUTRITION INTERVENTION IN TREATMENT & PRECENTION OF CHRONIC DISEASE

NURS 3010

FOUR (4) CREDITS 

Fall Term | Spring Term | Summer Term 

PREREQUISITES

BIOL 1610 or CHEM 1120

and

BIOL 2325 or BIOL 2420

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Nutritional biochemistry and cellular homeostasis are integrated with nutrition intervention in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. This course is designed for students anticipating a career in health care.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Food, Nutrition and Health
  2. Carbohydrates
  3. Fats
  4. Proteins
  5. Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism
  6. Energy Balance
  7. Weight Management
  8. Vitamins
  9. Minerals
  10. Water Balance
  11. Pregnancy and Lactation
  12. Infant, Childhood, and Adolescence
  13. Adult Nutrition
  14. Nutrition Care & Nutrition Support
  15. GI and Accessory Organs
  16. Cardiovascular Disease and Hypertension
  17. Diabetes
  18. Kidney Disease
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Describe the processes of digestion and metabolism for the macronutrients. Identify the structure, function, and dietary requirements of micro- and macronutrients to prevent toxicity or deficiency syndromes.
  • Specify and interpret the recommendations for a prudent diet as defined by the Dietary Guidelines and apply these recommendations to yourself as well as clinical case studies and scenarios.
  • Identify and apply various nutrition assessment techniques.
  • Demonstrate the relationships between medical nutritional therapy and treatment of chronic disease throughout the life cycle.
ADVANCE HUMAN NUTRITION

NUIP 4440

FOUR (4) CREDITS - Applied Science (AS) 

Fall Term | Spring Term 

PREREQUISITES 

NUIP 1020 and BIOL 1210

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Advanced study of macro- and micronutrients and their relationships to disease states, e.g., heart disease, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and osteoporosis. Body composition determination and weight issues. Physiological and metabolic bases of nutrient needs during the life cycle with clinical examples.

COURSE TOPICS
  1. Overview of Nutrition
  2. Intro to Mastering Nutrition
  3. Digestion
  4. Carbohydrates
  5. Lipids
  6. Coronary Artery Disease
  7. Protein
  8. Energy Metabolism
  9. Micronutrients in Metabolism
  10. Nutrition Rx
  11. Antioxidant Function
  12. Bone Health and Blood Health and Immunity
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • To evaluate individual nutrients, sources, functions, requirements and relationships to health and disease processes.
  • To understand the role of nutrition in the causation, prevention and treatment of diseases such as obesity, heart disease.
  • hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, iron deficiency anemia, and osteoporosis.
  • To understand the interdependence of nutrients and the importance of their proper balance.
  • To critically evaluate current nutrition information and recommendations.
Nutrition Minor

Elective Courses

APPLIED NUTRITION THROUGH THE LIFECYCLE

NUIP 2020

THREE (3) CREDITS

Fall Term | Spring Term 

PREREQUISITES

NUIP 1020 (minimum grade of C)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Nutritional requirements and practical applications in the life cycle. Incorporation of practical techniques for developing appropriate eating behaviors and healthy lifestyles. Nutrition assessment, chronic disease, and body composition through the life cycle will also be addressed.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Nutrition basics
  2. Preconception nutrition
  3. Nutrition during pregnancy
  4. Nutrition during lactation
  5. Infant, toddler and preschooler nutrition
  6. Child and preadolescent nutrition
  7. Adolescent nutrition
  8. Adult and older adult nutrition
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Understand the nutrition needs and requirements during:
    • Pregnancy and lactation, for both mother and infant, the neonatal and childhood years, the adult and geriatric years.
  • Understand the nutritional benefits and risks associated with the different stages of the life cycle.
  • Become familiar with the nutrition assessment techniques used for various age groups.
  • Become familiar with the emotional/mental aspects of working with patients at the extremes of the life span.
  • Understand practical techniques for developing appropriate eating behaviors and healthy lifestyles throughout the continuum of life.
  • Be able to apply this knowledge in a variety of settings and case scenarios.
NUTRITION FOR EXERCISE & SPORT

NUIP 3020

THREE (3) CREDITS

Spring Term 

PREREQUISITES

NUIP 1020 or NUIP 4440

and

KINES 3094 or NUIP 3091

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Designed for students in nutrition, exercise and sport science, health education, and other fields. This course will integrate nutrient metabolism, nutrition science, and exercise physiology as it applies to sport performance, exercise and health.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Intro to Sport Nutrition
  2. Review of Nutrient Recommendations
  3. Nutrition Assessment
  4. Energy Metabolism & Substrate Utilization
  5. Carbohydrate Metabolism and Recommendations
  6. Ketogenic Diets and Athletes
  7. Fatty Acid Metabolism and Recommendations
  8. Amino Acid Metabolism and Protein Recommendations
  9. Fluid Balance, Fluid & Electrolyte Requirements
  10. Nutritional Supplements & Ergogenic Aids
  11. Energy Balance & Weight Management
  12. Micronutrient Needs, Antioxidant Vitamins (Vitamins C and E)
  13. Micronutrient Needs, B Vitamins
  14. Micronutrient Needs, Vitamin D
  15. Minerals
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Identify specific nutrient needs of individuals who engage in physical activity/sport.
  • Describe human energy metabolism and substrate utilization (i.e., carbohydrate, fat, protein metabolism) at rest and during exercise.
  • Provide carbohydrate, protein and fat intake recommendations for before, during and after exercise.
  • Describe the changes that occur in micronutrient metabolism as a result of exercise and explain how these changes may impact the nutrient needs of physically active individuals.
  • Identify fluid needs for exercise and provide fluid intake recommendations to maintain optimal hydration.
  • Describe the components of the female athlete triad; identify risk factors, physiological complications, prevention, and treatment strategies.
  • Interpret/analyze scientific research pertaining to sports nutrition.
  • Evaluate sports nutrition information, nutritional supplements, and ergogenic aids and distinguish between scientifically sound information and nutritional quackery.
EATING DISORDERS & BODY IMAGE

HEDU 3350

THREE (3) CREDITS

Fall Term | Spring Term | Summer Term 

PREREQUISITES

None

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Insight into the underlying biological, psycho-emotional, and social causes of eating disorders and body image concerns.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Understanding eating disorders and body image
  2. Eating disorder treatment and recovery
  3. How media shapes our body image
  4. Recognizing weight bias and weight stigma
  5. Healthy behaviors gone bad
  6. Effective prevention programs
  7. Positive approaches to healthy minds and bodies
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Explain in your own words the different eating disorders and body image disorders.
  • Identify risk and protective factors for the development of eating disorders and body image disorders.
  • Demonstrate understanding of effective methods used in the treatment and prevention of eating disorders.
  • Explain in your own words the concepts of body positivity, intuitive eating, and Health At Every Size
  • Critique the role of media, including social media, as it relates to body image and weight stigma
  • Critique societal conceptions about "healthy behaviors" and the "ideal body."
CULTURAL ASPECTS OF FOOD

NUIP 3620

THREE (3) CREDITS - International Requirement (IR)

Fall Term | Spring Term | Summer Term 

PREREQUISITES

None

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Every day, people throughout the world must procure, select, prepare and consume food to sustain life. The manner in which they do this reflects complex interrelationships and interactions among the individuals, their culture and the world in which they live. These activities related to food are called food ways. Food preferences, a part of food ways, are largely subject to cultural forces. Cultural causes may determine food combinations eaten and may result from environmental conditions, social determinants, personal factors and situational factors. A biocultural perspective will be used to integrate culture and nutritional considerations. This course will introduce students to an international frame of references so that they may think critically about food preferences from a long-standing approach or traditional approach, as well as, newly emerging issues. This course will focus on international issues including the causes and effects of famine, the exploitation and decline of world fisheries, global marketing of food products and climatic and economic parameters of food production world wide. These contemporary issues will be related to historical approaches in order to facilitate a more complete understanding of international food and nutrition phenomena. The course will include hands-on kitchen laboratories, including tasting different dishes, food preparation of cultural specialties and exploring the relationship between food, history, culture and traditions.

 

COURSE TOPICS

  1. What is Food Culture?
  2. Food and Nutritional Needs
  3. Traditional Health Beliefs and Practices and Food Safety
  4. Intercultural Communication
  5. Food and Socioeconomic Interactions
  6. Food and Sustainable Systems
  7. Food and Culture
    • Europe
    • Africa
    • Latin America
    • East and Southeast Asia
    • South Asia and Middle East
    • Regional and Native America
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Evaluate the complexities of and variations across segments of historical and contemporary cultural practices as they pertain to food and its relative meanings
  • Demonstrate critical self-awareness and -reflexivity of intersections surrounding food, culture, and identity by utilizing some of the theoretical lenses attended to during the course
  • Analyze diverse perspectives and characterizations of food and nutrition, how cultures negotiate these varied understandings, and plausible limitations or constraints on creating comprehensive nutrition directives
  • Compare and contrast their subjective cultural food practices with those from a variety of backgrounds and present their assessments/conclusions
COMMUNITY-BASED PREVENTION PRACTICES IN HEALTH PROMOTION & EDUCATION

HEDU 4180

THREE (3) CREDITS

Fall Term | Spring Term | Summer Term 

PREREQUISITES

None

COURSE DESCRIPTION

An introduction to principles of community-based prevention in health promotion and education. Topics include the use of media advocacy, community organizing, and policy change to influence prevention efforts. Community-based prevention in the context of specific public health concerns such as substance abuse, violence, and mental health are discussed.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Why Prevention
  2. Health Equity and Social Justice
  3. Resilience
  4. Community Organizing
  5. Coalitions
  6. Policy
  7. Media Advocacy
  8. Violence
  9. Mental Health
  10. The Food Environment
  11. Substance Abuse
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Demonstrate a strong understanding of community-based prevention concepts and approaches.
  • Apply the spectrum of prevention to community health issues.
  • Create an op-ed using principles of media advocacy.
  • Analyze and evaluate community-based prevention efforts.
ADVANCED PEDIATRIC & ADOLESCENT NUTRITION

NUIP 5100

THREE (3) CREDITS

Spring Term

PREREQUISITES

NUIP 1020

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Meets with NUIP 6100. This class will examine nutrition needs of healthy infants, children, and adolescents as well as medical nutrition therapy for select pediatric diseases and chronic illnesses. Special emphasis will be placed on growth and development, pediatric nutrition assessment, and the effect of the environment on the nutritional intake of children and adolescents.

COURSE TOPICS
  1. Nutrition Assessment
  2. Physical Growth & Growth Charts
  3. Prenatal Nutrition
  4. Premature Infants
  5. Lactation
  6. Term Infant Nutrition
  7. Toddler Nutrition
  8. Pre-School Nutrition
  9. School Age Nutrition
  10. Teenage Nutrition
  11. Food Hypersensitivities
  12. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition
  13. Eating Disorders
  14. Developmental Disabilities
  15. Cystic Fibrosis
  16. Pediatric Oncology
  17. Cardiology and Traumatic Brain Injury
  18. Genetic Screening and Nutrition Management
  19. Weight Management
  20. Pediatric Diabetes
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Demonstrate knowledge of age, growth and normal development on nutritional requirements
  • Discuss techniques for conducting pediatric nutritional assessments
  • Describe health behaviors and educational needs of diverse populations
  • Create a PowerPoint presentation for a pediatric disease or condition
MAXIMIZING HUMAN PERFORMANCE

NUIP 5300

THREE (3) CREDITS

Fall Term | Spring Term

PREREQUISITES

None

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In this course we will explore the physiological factors that limit human performance for endurance and power sports. We then identify those limiting factors capable of adapting to training and what types of training might provide the most robust stimuli. Next we will explore the time course of recovery, adaptation, and detraining for each limiting factor. Students will integrate this information to develop training programs which we then compare and contrast with conventional best-practices programs. Finally, we will explore interventions to maximize performance and use modeling simulations to optimize pacing strategies.

 

COURSE TOPICS
  1. Endurance/Power Continuum
  2. Physiology of Endurance
    • Endurance Performance and Limiting Factors
      • VO2max and LT
      • Anaerobic and Economy
      • Training Adaptation
      • Potent Stimuli
    • Environmental Considerations
    • Adaptation/Recovery/Detraining
    • Training Stress
    • Impulse Response Model
    • Nutrition for Fuel, Recovery, Adaptation
    • Endurance Training Plan
  3. Maximizing Endurance Performance
    • Demand
    • Acute Interventions
    • Sport Psychology
  4. Physiology of Power
    • Maximum Power Performance and Fatigue
    • Limiting Factors
    • Training Stimuli
    • Adaptation/Recovery/Detraining
    • Nutrition for Fuel, Recovery, and Adaptation
    • Quantifying Training Stress
  5. Maximizing Power Performance
    • Acute Interventions
    • Pacing
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Describe physiological factors that limit human performance for endurance, power, and team sports.
  • Distinguish physiological mechanisms that will and will not adapt to training.
  • Explain why one particular training stimulus would be more effect than another.
  • Compare specificity for the whole-body task with specificity for the physiological mechanism.
  • Design evidence-based training programs for endurance, power, and team sports.
  • Compare evidence-based training programs developed by students with existing best-practices programs.
  • Explain how to optimize performance using existing physiological capacity.
METABOLISM OF MACRONUTRIENTS

NUIP 6440

FOUR (4) CREDITS

Fall Term

PREREQUISITES

Complete at least 1 of the following:

    • CHEM3510 - Biological Chemistry I (3)
    • MD CH5110 - Physiological Chemistry I (4)
  • NUIP Master’s Program students
  • Instructor’s consent
COURSE DESCRIPTION

Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and other related topics with emphasis on the regulation of energy metabolism and the inter-relationships of the biochemistry and nutrition of macronutrients and chronic disease.

COURSE TOPICS

  1. Lipids
  2. Carbohydrates
  3. Proteins
  4. Energy Metabolism
LEARNING OUTCOMES
  • Understand the primary metabolic pathways and their interaction in the biochemical control of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.
  • Understand energy transformation and interrelationships among macronutrients and their relationship to regulatory micronutrients.
  • Apply metabolic concepts of macronutrient metabolism to clinical nutrition.
  • Explore recent advances and controversies in clinical nutrition, chronic disease and genetics related to macronutrients, phytochemicals, fiber and oxidative stress.
  • Review current macronutrient research and nutrition publications; present, interpret and discuss nutrition issues of practical significance to peers.
  • Describe: At the end of this course students should be able to describe in biochemical and metabolic terms the control of the metabolism of CHO, Fat and Protein.

CONTACT US

Elirissa Hui

Academic Adviser, Nutrition Minor

Thunder Jalili, PhD

Director of Undergraduate Studies