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Health & Kinesiology Research

H & K Research and Discovery

Faculty, students, and staff are engaged in rigorous and impactful research ranging from understanding basic biological factors to examining community characteristics that contribute to health and wellness. Health & Kinesiology research is categorized into 4 general, overlapping, and non-exclusive themes that advance scientific understanding in the areas of:

  • Behavioral Science & Community Health
  • Cognitive and Motor Neuroscience
  • Exercise and Disease
  • Physical Activity and Well-Being

Check out our Google Scholar Page to see what we are up to! 

Kinesiology testing

Research Highlights

#10

RANKED KINESIOLOGY DOCTORAL PROGRAM

4

NEW GRANTS IN 2020-21 TOTALING $2,340,924

1200

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS COMBINED

9

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS

    • Exercise Intervention Lab
    • Exercise Testing lab
    • Sleep, Circadian Physiology, and Cognition Suite 
    • Metabolic Kitchen
    • Mobility and Stability Lab
    • Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Lab
    • Community-Engaged Research & Health Equity
    • Dissemination & Implementation Science
    • Exercise & Cancer Survivorship
    • Lifespan Motor Neuroscience
    • Neuromechanics & Applied Locomotion
    • Physical Activity and Health Promotion Science
    • Sleep & Circadian Physiology
    • Sleep & Motor Memory
    • Title: Persistence of hippocampal and striatal multivoxel patterns during awake rest after motor sequence learning
    • Research team(s): Brad King and Genevieve Albouy
    • Stage of the project: Published in iScience
    • Key findings: Animal research suggests that memory consolidation is supported by the reactivation of brain activity during subsequent offline episodes, i.e., after learning has ended. Recent methodological advances in neuroimaging allow us to study reactivation processes in the human brain. In this study, we used such approaches to show that brain patterns elicited by a motor learning task in the human striatum and hippocampus – two brain regions critically involved in motor learning - are reactivated during post-encoding rest. These results provide novel insights into the functional significance of neural reactivation after motor sequence learning in humans.
    • Next steps: Investigate whether aging is accompanied by a disruption of these neural reactivations and whether such disruptions are linked to the deficit in motor memory consolidation observed during aging. 
  • Accolades:

    •  Tanya Halliday, College of Health Distinguished Mentor of the Year Award Recipient

    Awards:

    • Congratulations to Dr. Kota Takahashi for leading two successful NIH Awards focusing on the relationship between thermo-regulation and tissue complications for people with leg amputations and on a framework to help improve foot and ankle function as people age. Read more>
    • Doctoral student, Selene Tobin received a Clinical and Translational Science Institute Predoctoral Fellowship

    Accomplishments:

    • PhD Student Jason Thomas was selected to give an oral presentation at the ACSM Annual Meeting 

KEY FACULTY PUBLICATIONS