Students & Education

History

The University of Utah is the state’s oldest and largest institution of higher education and is a major research university. The U offers over 100 undergraduate and more than 90 graduate degree programs to over 31,000 students. The University of Utah is one of the state’s largest employers and is ranked as one of the top public research universities in the nation. The University of Utah is accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges and was last accredited in 2006.

The physical therapy program at the University of Utah has a long-standing tradition of excellence dating back to the admission of its first class in 1969. This makes the University of Utah program in physical therapy one of the oldest in the region. The Department of Physical Therapy is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

The current DPT program at the University of Utah reflects the breadth, depth, and necessary rigor of the professional physical therapist education curriculum in response to the current and expected future health care environment. This health care environment includes an enhanced role and higher expectations of the physical therapist, including a commitment to evidence-based physical therapy services and patient care. These skills must be achieved by the completion of an entry-level professional program, which is the outcome expected of our students upon completion of the DPT.

Mission

The faculty of the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Utah considers their fundamental mission to be consistent with that of the University. The Department seeks to:

  1. Address the health care needs for physical therapy of the community, state, and region by educating physical therapy practitioners;
  2. Investigate, discover and transmit knowledge related to physical therapy;
  3. Provide services to the academic, professional, and general communities in which the Department is involved.

We regard physical therapy as a health care profession that has as its primary purpose the promotion of human health and function through the application of scientific principles to identify, assess, correct, prevent, or alleviate acute or prolonged human impairment, functional limitation, and disability.

The faculty believes that physical therapy education represents the initial commitment to professional service and life-long learning. Professional preparation should be based upon a liberal education in sciences and humanities which serves to develop the values necessary to function effectively and humanely in an ever-changing society. The professional component of the curriculum must address both current trends and future needs of society. Students must be prepared not only for a current level of practice but also be prepared to adapt to future changes throughout their career. The professional curriculum should prepare students to be confident in the multifaceted roles of clinical practitioner, teacher, researcher, consultant, administrator, and life-long learner.

The fundamental beliefs of the faculty are reflected in the curricular content of the proposed program. They align with the University of Utah 's primary mission, which includes creating an environment where the highest standards of scholarship and professional practice are observed, and where the responsibilities to students are conscientiously met.

Latest News

Marking World AIDS Day: U of U Health to Provide Free HIV-Prevention Meds and Counseling Starting January
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Dec 01, 2017

Marking World AIDS Day: U of U Health to Provide Free HIV-Prevention Meds and Counseling Starting January

Internal Medicine, ,

Utah will soon be home to one of the only free HIV prevention clinics in the U.S., and it all started with a plucky medical student named Jorgen Madsen. Starting in January, everyone — whether they have insurance or not — will have access through University of Utah Health to a game-changing medication-based HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP), which earned FDA approval in 2012 and has been shown to be more than 90% effective at preventing HIV.... Read More

Internal Medicine
Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections
Research
Feb 06, 2017

Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections

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Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile often shortened to C. diff now the most common hospital acquired infection in the United States. But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole. ... Read More

Internal Medicine

College of Health

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