Accreditation

Accreditation is a process used in the US to assure the quality of the education that students receive. The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) is an accrediting agency that is nationally recognized by the US Department of Education (USDE) and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). CAPTE grants specialized accreditation status to qualified entry-level education programs for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.

The Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Utah is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; telephone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org.

Graduates of our program are eligible to sit for the national licensure examination for the physical therapist administered by the The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy.

The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy

The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy develops and administers the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) for physical therapists.

The Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy
124 West Street South, Third Floor
Alexandria, VA 22314

https://www.fsbpt.org

Successful completion of this examination (NPTE), along with individual state board requirements, grants the status of licensed physical therapist (PT).

Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing

The Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing, also known as DOPL, is the state agency which regulates the practice of physical therapy within Utah and grants license to practice.

DOPL is located in the Heber M. Wells state office building at 160 East 300 South, Salt Lake City.

http://www.dopl.utah.gov/licensing/physical_therapy.html

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